The Orpheus myth and the powers of music
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The Orpheus myth and the powers of music by Vladimir L. Marchenkov

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Published by Pendragon Press in Hillsdale, NY .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 165-176) and index.

Statementby Vladimir L. Marchenkov
SeriesInterplay : music in interdisciplinary dialogue -- no. 7, Interplay (Hillsdale, N.Y.) -- no. 7.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsML3845 .M315 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiii, 181 p. :
Number of Pages181
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24500109M
ISBN 101576471764
ISBN 109781576471760
LC Control Number2010564244
OCLC/WorldCa419874117

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Agnew persuasively connects the English traveler and music scholar Charles Burney with the ancient myth of Orpheus. She uses Burney as a guide through wide-ranging discussions of eighteenth-century musical travel, views on music's curative powers, interest in non-European music Cited by: Examines the key turning points in the history of the Orpheus myth as factors that shaped, and continues to shape, our conceptions of music's powers. This study follows three threads in the myth's history: changes in form, cultural status, and the resulting visions of the powers of song.   Agnew persuasively connects the English traveler and music scholar Charles Burney with the ancient myth of Orpheus. She uses Burney as a guide through wide-ranging discussions of eighteenth-century.   Orpheus tries to get her back and creates music to tame the underworld, but he dies at the hands of those that cannot hear his divine music. I always receive news of a new Powers novel /5().

  The Argonauts were full of fear for what the music portended. Orpheus conjured up the sound of buzzing on his lyre, as his fingers ran up and down the instrument, and all the Argonauts ducked.   Orpheus was so skilled on his lyre that he was able to charm even inanimate objects with his music, and to convince Hades, the god of the underworld, to free his deceased wife and muse.   Orpheus in the underworld (Met) Orpheus descended into Hades and by the power of his music succeeded in persuading Pluto to allow Eurydice to follow him back to earth, on the condition that he did not look back at her until they reached the upper world. But at the last moment he did so and Eurydice vanished for ever into the shades. Orpheus and Eurydice Retellings Score A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book.

  I think it’s also a mistake to impute too much power to Orpheus’ music, as in Namm’s Greek Myths, which tends to turn the hero into a magician rather than an artist. When Edith Hamilton. Orpheus and His Soul. Orpheus (meaning “darkness” or “fatherless,” so an “orphan”) is a poet and singer, and son of the god Apollo, the god of light, poetry, and healing. Orpheus’s wife, Eurydice (meaning “deep justice”), whom he dearly loves, is bitten by a snake and dies. David Almond's novel, A Song for Ella Grey, was inspired by the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, and won the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize in The novel Orfeo by Richard Powers is based on Orpheus. [citation needed] [clarification needed] Dino Buzzati adapted the Orpheus motif in his graphic novel Poem Strip ().Children: Musaeus. Orpheus, ancient Greek legendary hero endowed with superhuman musical skills. He became the patron of a religious movement based on sacred writings said to be his own. Traditionally, Orpheus was the son of a Muse (probably Calliope, the patron of epic poetry) and Oeagrus, a king of Thrace (other versions give Apollo).